Talking to your dog on your walks

5
Sharefacebook Talking to your dog on your walkstwitter Talking to your dog on your walksgoogle Talking to your dog on your walkspinterest Talking to your dog on your walks

Bark Magazine recently posted the comment on their Facebook page “Walking while talking, do you think it makes a difference to your dog?” It turns out that the post it links to asks whether you talk on your cell phone while walking your dog, and highlights a danger of being distracted, or disengaged, while walking your dog (your dog can pick up or eat undesirable items, or worse). I thought it was something completely different! This article will explain why talking to your dog on your daily walk is actually a helpful dog training tool.

8010642673_df05d9c34a_z Talking to your dog on your walks

It is probably obvious to many why chatting on a cellphone is not a good way to walk a dog. You are not walking with your dog, so not only might you miss the dangers, but you are missing the opportunity to engage with your dog. Engaging with your dog is much more than just staying off the cell phone, and monitoring how they walk or what they might pick up on the sidewalk. This means talking to your dog, while on the walk. And that’s what I originally thought the article was about!

I rarely see anyone ever talking to or with their dog while out on a walk. I see much more of the cell-phone use mentioned in the BARK article. Why might you engage in a conversation with your dog, smile at (with!) them, and otherwise communicate with them?

There are several advantages to talking to your dog while on a walk:

  • Build or strengthen your relationship with your dog: this is the main advantage – you turn this from a solo activity into an activity you are doing with your dog and mutually enjoying. And building a relationship is the best tool of all when it comes to training. You can use it for every single training activity (from flyball to basic obedience).
  • Improve how your dog walks on a leash: talking with your dog takes their attention away from pulling, zig-zagging, darting at squirrels, and onto you when you engage with them. Keep talking and keep their attention, and they don’t pull. I used this technique on more than one dog, and it worked wonders.
  • Reduce your own stress, as it increases your enjoyment in the activity (smiling changes your own mood!)
  • Distract them from things they need distracting from (that other dog, the bicyclist, the piece of tasty litter). If you learn how to get your dogs attention and keep it by regularly speaking with them on a walk, you can use this tool to distract them when advantageous.

And I assure you, my dogs do look at me and “talk back” when I engage with them in this manner. Mort will give me the happiest, most childish giddy looks when I start talking. I love every minute of it.

I know you might think this is the mark of a crazy-person, but I assure you it is not. It’s a positive kind of crazy at any rate, bonding with your companion, and I haven’t yet noticed any stares from neighbors when I talk to my dogs on our walks. And even if they do a double-take, who cares! It’s a positive, non-aversive training technique and an enjoyable activity for you and your dog to do together. And it doesn’t get as simple, cheap, and easy-to-do than the walks you take with your dog every day.

88x31 Talking to your dog on your walks
This work, unless otherwise expressly stated, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Share.

About Author

Jen deHaan is graphic designer, small business owner, and dog person living in Bay Area, California. She likes to support local and national efforts for animal welfare and advocacy. Jen enjoys learning about dog training and behavior, and has taken several courses and seminars since 2010. It all started with a great dog called Mikey (aka "dude"), loved and lost but remembered forever. Jen also runs a freelance business focusing on graphic, web, and UI design at FoundPixel, and a small business creating hand crafted dog products at Stylish Canine.

  • http://twitter.com/theDIYdog The DIY Dog

    Nice blog! I just followed your CA Pets Alive – I look forward to hearing more and being able to help out (I’m in SoCal and our shelter animals need all the help they can get.)

    Are the dogs in the photo your dogs? The one on the right looks JUST like my dog, well at least without seeing the face. :)

    • jdehaan

      Thanks so much! Hopefully we will get some resources out to the CA Pets Alive group soon, as we are going to start a shelter evaluation quite soon. We hope to have some tools so anyone can help out with gathering statistics (in a standardized way so they can be easily input/shared). Really glad to hear you’re following!

      Yep, those are my dawgs — the other side of the dog on the right is this: http://www.flickr.com/photos/jdehaan/6332088360/ :)

      • http://twitter.com/theDIYdog The DIY Dog

        Wow, they could be Patty Duke cousins! This is Sienna:
        https://picasaweb.google.com/105075299591536042724/SiennaTokala
        Different face and a bit smaller, but really similar. Do you know what breed(s) Tigger is?

        Thanks for the follow back, too. Look forward to seeing more from the CA Pets Alive group!

        • jdehaan

          Wow! Their fur and the shape is almost identical (bloomers and tail, coloring – wow!) Just the head size! We believe Tig is an English Shepherd (sable), aka “farm collie”, as we’ve found some pictures where the breed is known and she would fit right in :) We took her to a herding temp test, and she worked in the “loose eye” high-up style of an english shepherd, so we figured that guess was better than border collie mix!

          And Sienna is absolutely adorable! What a happy looking dog!

    • jdehaan

      Oh and just followed your Twitter!

(function (tos) { window.setInterval(function () { tos = (function (t) { return t[0] == 50 ? (parseInt(t[1]) + 1) + ':00' : (t[1] || '0') + ':' + (parseInt(t[0]) + 10); })(tos.split(':').reverse()); window.pageTracker ? pageTracker._trackEvent('Time', 'Log', tos) : _gaq.push(['_trackEvent', 'Time', 'Log', tos]); }, 10000); })('00');